WassonArtistry.com
The Art and Craft of Jeff Wasson
Armor :: Helmets

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Welcome to the helmets section. Here are some of the helmets I have made over the years.

This one is a 1460s armet with wrapper. Notice the lifting peg so the wearer can open the visor.

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Same as above, 1460s Italian Armet. Made of 1050 hardened and tempored spring steel. This one is based off an Armet in the reserve collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

I have jousted with it. It is a close fitting helmet that allows good protection. The wrapper and the skull re-enforce give two layers of steel. The wrapper also protects the neck between the join of the helmet and breastplate but still allows for some mobility. The visor can be easily opened and closed and can be removed or replaced with other types of visors.

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Morion, Etched, Gilt, and blued spring steel.

This helmet is based on helmets worn by court gaurds in the mid 16th century. The morion is a very fashionable helmet, but it still has many functional aspects. The high comb will deflect blows coming down onto it. The upward turned brim also will deflect blows or catch them and keep a blade from cutting into the face or neck. The open face allows the wearer good sight -- even if firing a gun or crossbow.

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Morion, Same as above. As well as being functional the form also worked well to show off the art of the etcher.
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Morion, Same as above. Here is a close up of the etched and gilt surfaces. Etching was done with acid. The gold is real gold leaf. The bluing was done with heat. The lion head rivets were specially cast just for this project.
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Bascinet with klapvisor. Hardened spring steel.
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Same as above. Based on mid 14th century types. The hinge of the visor is held in place by a hooked stud and a spring pin. This helmet will be used by someone in a club that does medieval combat.
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A Mid 15th c. Armet.

Made of 1050 hardened spring steel. This is type of helmet that most people think of when you say "knight in shining armour". This style of helmet is very protective, and very functional.

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Side view of the same helmet as above.

This type of helmet has a wrapper that adds an extra layer of metal across the face -- you can see the strap that holds it in place running around the back. The visor can be raised using the lifting peg -- jutting out from a notch cut in the top edge of the wrapper. This helmet has a pomme and you can see the edge of the feathered plume hanging down.

This helmet has been used for jousting in 3 different countries -- France, Belgium, and USA! And it worked great!

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Sallet, mild steel.

Mid 15th c.

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Blackened, 1050 hardened steel Bascinet. 2010.

Late 14th c.

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A Great Bascinet with an exchange visor.

The jousting visor is in place; you can see how it has a narrow vision slit and is shaped to scoop any impact away.

This helmet belongs to the md 15th c. tournament armor, in the armor section.

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The Great Bascinet with the visor for fighting in melee, foot combat and battle. It is perforated for better breath and visibility.

The top of the helmet is adorned with a pomme or orb, with "rays" radiating down. From the pomme a plume of feathers jets up. These decorations make for an ostentatious display of wealth and heraldry.

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Visored Bascinet. 1050 Hardened steel, 2006.

1390-1400. This helmet was raised from a cone. It's shape, and the visor's shape are carefully copied from pieces in the armoury of Churburg. The pomme and visor pivots are gold plated. The aventaille was supplied by the customer.

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Side view of the same helmet.
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The side of the visor most likely to take the impact of a lance does not have any breaths. This will make it stronger and less likely for a lance or spear to catch.
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Visored Bascinet. 1050 Hardened steel, 2004.

Late 14th century. This Helmet was based off of one in the Metropolitan museum of Art. It is not an exact copy but I was trying to capture the lines of this unique style of helmet. I use this helmet to joust in; You'll notice the spring button to keep the visor down. While catches like this can be found on later helmets this is not contemporary for bascinets, but a modern addition to keep me safe.

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Visored Bascinet. 1050 Hardened steel, 2007.

This helmet has a very rounded visor, based loosely off of manuscript pictures and other medieval artwork. This type of visor would be used for war or for combat on foot in a tournament.

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The Same helmet as above, with the visor raised. Here you can clearly see the bevor plate, which pivots by two rivets on either side of the helmet. The use of plates like this can be seen in artwork and would lead to the developement of the great bascinet. The aventaille still attaches to the bottom of the helmet with vervailles.
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