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The Art and Craft of Jeff Wasson
Armor :: Limb Defenses; Armor for the Arms and Legs

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Late 14th century Arm and leg harness. Made of 1050 hardened spring steel for a gentleman who fought in the Battle of the Nations last year (2012). These are blackened with linseed oil. These pieces, along with helmet and gauntlets won an award for best armour last year at Battle of the Nations.
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Another set of Late 14th c. arm and legharness with gauntlets. These are polished bright.
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Pauldrons copied very closely from the Frederick the 5th Armour in Vienna.

These are made of 1050 spring steel. They are very protective but still allow a good range of motion. You are seeing the back of the right pauldron and the front of the left.

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Same as above.

These are polished to a mirror finish. The gentleman who owns them, jousts in them as well as fights mounted melee and fights with a poleaxe on foot. They go beautifully with the rest of his mid 15th century armour.

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A late 14th c., early 15th c. Legharness. Notice how all the subtle shapes of the of human leg can be seen in the armour. A good armour is functional and follows the form of the body, but it can also curve away from the body and create glancing surfaces, such as the knees on this legharness.

Made of 1050 hardened and tempored spring steel.

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The same as above. This is a detail of the "stop rib" -- a sculpted steel bar that deflects the points of weapons away from the edges of armour. They can usually be found on armours of the early 15th c.

An armourer's mark can be seen stamped in the metal on the left side.

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Same as above. The "Cuisses" - Armour for the thighs. There is a medial ridge that runs down the front plates, through the knees and into the greaves. This serves to strengthen the armour and also to deflect the points of weapons and arrows. The cuisse demi greave connects to the greave through a hole and pin. A strap and buckle holds it tight.
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An Italian cuisse. 1050 hardened spring steel. Mid 15th c.

These are based off of B1 in Mantua, and other similar armours from Churburg. The wing of the knee cop is quite large.

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The same as above. Here they have been polished up bright and are with the greaves.
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A detail of the knee cop wing -- A very sculptural shape that wraps three quarters of the way around the knee and protects very well. Also you can see the fringe of maille rivetted to the demi greave -- An Italian fashion.
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Full greaves. 1050 spring steel

July 2008.

Same as above.

These greaves are based off of mid 15th century Italian greaves. Greaves can be one of the most difficult pieces of armour to make. They must conform to the leg exactly; if they don't they can hobble the wearer.

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Late 14th c. sabatons, of 1050 hardened spring steel.
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A pair of arm harness based off of Italian arms of the 1450s-60s. These are made of 1050 hardened spring steel.

The left arm has a reinforcing plate that can be removed for more mobility, or if a shield is to be used. The left is also the side that will take the brunt of an attack.

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A photo showing the inner side of the arms above.

Notice how the wing completely wraps around to the inside of the arm in order to deflect any weapon point away.

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A pair of arm harness of 1050 hardened steel made in the style of the late 14th early 15th century.
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Arm harness. 1050 hardened steel with brass decoration.

These Arms were inspired by the monumental brass of Sir John d'Abernon, c 1340. They articulate on leathers and the vambrace is hinged by an integral hinge.

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A detail of the shoulder "rondelle".

It's difficult to tell from the funeral brass if what Sir John is wearing is a rondelle or some sort of shoulder spaulder. I chose to interpret it as a spaulder, and it seems to work very well.

The applied brass really makes it spiffy!

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Cuisses. 1050 hardened spring steel with applied brass edge.

June 2008

These cuisses (thigh armour) have been left rough from the hammer and have been blackened with linseed oil that has been burned into the surface.

These are late 14th c. design.

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Arm Harness. 1050 hardened spring steel.

spring 2007 ?

These arm harness are also blackened and have an applied brass edgeing. The brass has been decorated with an engraving technique called wriggle-work.

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A close up of the decoration.

Wriggle work is often seen on applied brass edgeing of 14th century armour. It is done with a small chisel-like tool that is wiggled back and forth to make a decorative pattern.

The shape of the elbow fan was inspired by the effigy of the Black Prince in Canterbury Cathedral. His effigy also has rosettes.

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14th century Arm Harness. 1050 hardened steel

Summer and fall of 2006.

These have an integral hinge, and are based loosely on the arms in Chartre Cathedral.

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Leg-harness for a gothic armour. Mild steel.

Spring 2004

The cuisses are fluted and ride high up the leg. You can see the points (laces) by which the weight of the legharness is held in position. These laces come from the arming coat, or doublet.

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