WassonArtistry.com
The Art and Craft of Jeff Wasson
Armor :: Various

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A sabaton and spur, from the mid 15th c. tournament armour.
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A composite armour representing armour that might of been seen at the end of the 14th century or the beginning of the 15th.

The arm and leg harness are blackened but the knee, elbow and shoulder articulations are gold plated -- as seen in manuscript pictures of that time.

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Another sabaton and spur.
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A pair of mid 15th c. sabatons, made of mild steel.
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Elements of late 15th c. armour.

In the middle ages an armour was called a "harness". It was composed of different pieces that were laced and strapped onto the body, and that overlapped in a way that gave great protection and good movement.

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A gladiator armour!

This armour was made for a gentleman that fights in a combat club. He wanted to show as much skin as possible to taunt his adversaries!

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Indian armor, Mild steel.

This armor was made for a client who wanted props for a portrait painting. The armor was based on an 18th century indian armor in a museum in England.

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14th century Arm Harness. 1050 hardened steel

Summer and fall of 2006.

These have an integral hinge, and are based loosely on the arms in Chartre Cathedral.

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Milanese Arm Harness

These are a part of the milanese harness.

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Armor was laced onto an undergarment known under many different names, pourpoint, gambeson, arming doublet. These drawings depict my interpetations of what a 14th century arming jacket might have looked like.

The large armhole is called a "Grand Aissette", and allows very free movement with a snug fit.

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Drawings of Sabbatons.

Sabbatons can be tricky; They must fit closely to the foot, but not hinder or chafe. They must also interact with the greaves, protecting and allowing movement.

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1050 Hardened steel harness. Sept. 2005.

This harness was made as a simple late 14th century armour. The plates were left rough from the hammer and were blackened.

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Another view of the same armour.

The client wanted something lightweight, protective, dent resistent and easy to maintain. Hardened steel allowed thinner metal to be used, but was more dent resistent than mild steel. Thinner metal also meant lighter weight.

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